Category Archives: Blog

the backstory of living with dementia

BORDERLINE HEALTHCARE: THE BACKSTORY

13 MARCH 2015

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On the battlegrounds in the mountainous terrains of Afghanistan, American soldiers had waged a mighty struggle to avoid constant ambush. At home, primary caregivers could find themselves facing a similar struggle whenever they open their doors to the services of home health agencies.  Always try to establish open lines of communications with visiting nurses. If you don’t, your whole family could become embattled in a horrible experience that they will not soon forget. Continue reading BORDERLINE HEALTHCARE: THE BACKSTORY

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02 MARCH 2015

THE DEATH PANEL:  THE BACK STORY

 

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“In hospitals, we see them everywhere.   Senior doctors in white coats–males and females–with trainees in tow. We see them marching up and down the shiny tiled halls of our medical facilities.  They barely have time to talk to you as they rush in and out of hospital rooms with plastic clipboards and pens in hand.   Are these people potentially “medical terminators” waiting to pass judgment on our loved one’s life expectancy?   Once before, I’ve  had them threaten  me to take away my mom.   Are they part of some  secret “death panel”?

Continue reading 02 MARCH 2015

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21 FEBRUARY 2015

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ON  WINGS OF EMOTIONS: THE BACK STORY

The month is early May.  It’s 1:00 pm in the afternoon. Outside is nice and moderate with a gentle cool breeze in the air. I’m sitting in one of those plastic green lawn chairs on my front porch filling in crossword puzzles.  On our block on the westside of town, it can get awfully peaceful and quiet.  No screaming kids. No “hoopties” pacing up and down the street with loud music. Nobody mowing grass. Finally, I get a chance to just relax and recharge my batteries. Today had been one of mom’s better days. When I had left her bedroom , she had been resting comfortably. I couldn’t ask for anything more. Or could I? Continue reading 21 FEBRUARY 2015

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23 January 2015

UNEASY RIDER:  THE BACK STORY

“As a primary caregiver, your life will always be a neverending saga when living with a love one who has dementia.  Even at the early stages, there must always be a constant vigilance….”

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It had been 9:00am that morning.  A bright yellow sun now nestled in light-blue skies beckoned us.  Our windows were half opened.  So, the sweet aromas of a brand new day rushed in—filling our nostrils with the inspiration of new beginnings.

Already we had been driving around the city for two hours now, my mother and I.   On occasions we would get up early in the morning and drive around–especially when she had been feeling restless.  And since her Dementia, we had been taking these early morning drives more often than not. Continue reading 23 January 2015

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07 January 2015

images (1)LAYING IT ON THE LINE:   THE BACK STORY

Racing up and down the streets–block by block, I had no idea where I was going.  I knew my mom had been somewhere close.  —But where??!    She couldn’t have gone far.   All I could do was continue to follow my instincts.

Suddenly I brought the car to a screeching halt.  Two young ladies were slowly strolling  up the street on my driver’s side.  I stuck my head out of the window as I blew my horn at them in quick-short successions.

“Excuse me miss!  DId you see an elderly gray haired woman walking around the neighborhood?” Continue reading 07 January 2015

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01 January 2015

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THESE DOORS ARE MADE FOR LOCKING:  THE BACKSTORY
Back in 2001, the symptoms of Dementia had  begun creeping into another stage of manifestation.   Mom had already been showing a good bit of restlessness.   She hadn’t been  taking her evening naps as much. And she would pace for most of the day.  But now she had begun pacing at night.    Sometimes she would startle me as she began double checking doors and windows.   I would call out to her.
“Mom…you better get some sleep.  Do you want me to sit with you for a little while?”
No, honey.  you go ahead and get some rest.  I’ll be ok.  Just checking the door”,  she’d reply in a normal tone of voice.   I didn’t think anything was wrong.  Dealing with a parent with Dementia had still been something new to us.

Continue reading 01 January 2015

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